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    Upcoming events

    August 28: River cleanup at Resilience Fest Join us on Sunday, August 28 from 9:30 – 11:00 am for a river cleanup in South Royalton as part of the White River Resilience Festival. Volunteers should dress in close-toed shoes and long pants, and meet at the bridge. Gloves and bags will be provided. For more information about […]

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    Volunteers improve access to White River

    On July 12 a group of 10 Russian students from Project Harmony International, along with WRP, Vermont River Conservancy, and Project Harmony staff, improved public access to the White River at Clifford Park in West Hartford, VT. In 4 hours the students built a 10-step stone staircase leading down to the river’s edge; cleared and widened a second […]

  • Randolph Elementary at Green Acres farm

    Volunteers plant 50,000th tree

    700 students and community volunteers helped the WRP plant over 4,000 native trees along the White River in 9 locations this spring. This brings the WRP’s Trees for Streams Program totals to 50,000 trees planted since 2001. Follow this link to see pictures of the volunteers in action! Planting sites From late-April through mid-May the […]

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    WRP receives funding to remove Randolph dam

    The White River Partnership has received four grants to remove a dam on the Third Branch of the White River in Randolph. The Randolph Dam is located on the east side (downstream) of the Main Street Bridge in Randolph village.  The current structure, located at the approximate site of the original foundry dam, is a […]

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    Monitoring the White River

    The WRP’s Monitoring the White River Program engages watershed teachers and students in classroom and field work activities that raise awareness about watershed issues and create opportunities for hands-on, place-based ecology education.

About White River Watershed

What is a watershed?

A watershed is an area of land where all of the rain, snowmelt, and water flowing downhill drain into the same body of water – a river, stream, or lake. Water slides down the sides of the area from the highest point to the bottom of the watershed, like a basin filling with water. On its way, the water travels over the land – across fields, forests, back yards, streets and roads, or seeps into the soil and travels underground (becoming groundwater).

The next time it rains or the snow melts, think about the path the water coming from your home travels. If you live in the White River watershed, it eventually joins the White River and from there travels to the Connecticut River in White River Junction, Vermont. Four major watersheds make up the State of Vermont: the Connecticut River watershed (of which the White River watershed is part), the Lake Champlain watershed, the St. Lawrence watershed, and the Hudson River watershed.

White River watershed

The White River watershed encompasses 710 square miles, draining portions of Addison, Orange, Rutland, Washington and Windsor Counties, including 50,000 acres of the Green Mountain National Forest. The White River originates in the Town of Ripton on the slopes of Battell Mountain, then flows southerly and easterly before merging with the Connecticut River in the Town of Hartford. The 56-mile main stem of the White River has 5 major tributaries: the First Branch, the Second Branch, the Third Branch, the West Branch, and the Tweed River.

The White River is significant for being one of the last free-flowing rivers in the State of Vermont, and is the longest un-dammed tributary to the Connecticut River, which is an American Heritage River.  The White River watershed is also a designated Special Focus Area of the US Fish & Wildlife Service Silvio O. Conte National Fish & Wildlife Refuge.

Maps

White River watershed towns

White River sub-watersheds

Quintown Resilience Tour logo

Resilience Tour will highlight Quintown projects

On Sunday, August 21 from 2:00 – 5:00 pm the Quintown Collaborative will host a free Resilience Tour to highlight completed on-the-ground projects that prepare the Quintown valley for the next flood. In 2011 Tropical Storm Irene devastated the Quintown valley, which includes the towns of Granville, Hancock, Rochester, Stockbridge, and Pittsfield along the Upper […]

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IMG_0480

Volunteers improve access to White River

On July 12 a group of 10 Russian students from Project Harmony International, along with WRP, Vermont River Conservancy, and Project Harmony staff, improved public access to the White River at Clifford Park in West Hartford, VT. In 4 hours the students built a 10-step stone staircase leading down to the river’s edge; cleared and widened a second […]

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Millard-Smith Hancock WR flooding 2010

Floodplain field conserved in Hancock

The White River Partnership (WRP), Vermont River Conservancy (VRC), and 2 private landowners have conserved 15.4 acres of floodplain along the White River in Hancock. Tropical Storm Irene flood waters deposited large amounts of sediment on the field, which often floods during high water events.  The floodplain conservation project prohibits future development and compensates the landowners […]

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